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77% FUNDED GIVE NOW
  • $7,720 RAISED OF $10,000 GOAL
  • 46 PARTICIPANTS
  • 0 DAYS REMAINING

RECENT GIFTS

  • Jason Walther $700
  • Kip Bohne $1,000
  • David J Weinert $100
  • Lisa Lange $200
  • Robert Young $150

Larry Estlack Memorial Scholarship

Larry left a lasting impact on Michigan State University and so, in honor of him, the Larry Estlack Memorial Scholarship has been created to help make a significant impact for future students in the College of Communication Arts & Sciences. Back in the early '70s, Larry taught telecommunication courses at MSU on the fourth floor of the Union Building – the introductory and advanced radio production classes that no one else on the faculty wanted to teach. Larry designed and built the studios which were a haven and a laboratory and provided the opportunity to work with hundreds of students, teaching them how to edit, produce commercials, conduct interviews, and more importantly, what it took to be a radio professional.

After leaving MSU, Larry started up a TV production program at Lansing's Harry Hill High School and then eventually built a career at the Michigan Association of Broadcasters. And for anyone across Michigan who has ever taken shelter due to hearing, or seeing, an EAS alert on radio or television – they have Larry to thank for it. Larry headed up the state's Emergency Alert System and was in constant contact with local, state and national authorities, police departments, the National Weather Service and broadcasters to ensure that this vital form of emergency communication operated effectively for the citizens of Michigan.

A generation of broadcasters learned their trade from Larry Estlack. He was a true renaissance man; an engineer, an architect, and an artist who had an ear for great music. He taught hundreds of MSU students the art of radio production and, as "Larry Allen", was known as the one DJ in town who played every record request you could imagine. He had the skill and ability to have what we in the business call a major market career. But he never left the Lansing area. Larry's engineering expertise lives on in the dozens of radio and television studios he built around the state. And his memory will live on for future generations of Spartans through the scholarship created here in his name.

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